Minneapolis: City of Shame

Once upon an eternity ago now, Minneapolis was a city  built around lakes and parks and open spaces.  Now it’s simply become a lunatic asylum.  Being Scandinavian-rich, it gave birth to such clowns as Hubert Humphrey, Orville Freeman, and Walter Mondale.  They typified the soft socialism that marred the 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s.  

Then the Mississippi River, which supplies the city with its drinking water, fed the citizens with an increasingly bizarre potion.  That’s about all I can figure since leftist steroids metastasized uncontrollably.  And today we are graced with a pot full of regurgitated political hacks struggling mightily to demonstrate that idiocy has no limits.

And so, just this past summer we enjoyed a parade of incompetence and rage that torched businesses, smashed windows, pillaged property and roamed the streets of the city with BLM paraphernalia, torches, megaphones, and rage stoked by unrestrained boredom. 

And the city’s response?  Let the children roam unchecked!   Let the fires burn!  Let the looters help themselves to what they fancied! 

I can’t imagine even the likes of Hubert Humphrey allowing the “social-justice” warriors to run wild in the city. I’ve pondered this matter and have concluded there is something in the city’s water that helps explain the Minneapolis asylum.  You see the same behavior in St. Louis and New Orleans and God knows what other burgs en route to the Gulf of Mexico.

It’s either that or, as H.L. Mencken might surmise: God is playing his usual trick on humanity. 

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